Top Snorkeling and Scuba Diving in Scotland

Ready to check out the best sites in Scotland for scuba diving, snorkeling, shore diving, free diving or other ocean activities? Zentacle has 22 dive sites, snorkel spots, beaches, and more. Discover hand-curated maps, along with reviews and photos from nature lovers like you. No matter what you're looking for, you can find a diverse range of the best ocean activities in Scotland to suit your needs.
Scotland dive site map
V 83 Destroyer

#1 - V 83 Destroyer

UK, Scotland, Orkney Isles, Scapa Flow

beginner
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The V83 Destroyer is a Torpedo-boat destroyer, V 67-84 class, built by A.G. Vulcan at Hamburg during 1916. She sank on 21st June 1919. She is a shallow Scapa wreck. She lies in two parts. The bows is in 8 metres and stern in 16 metres. She is a good second dive. NE side of Rysa Little island.
SMS Brummer

#2 - SMS Brummer

UK, Scotland, Orkney Isles, Scapa Flow

intermediate
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The SMS Brummer was a 140m long Bremse class vessel. It was built at Stettin by A.G. Vulcan and launched on 11 December 1915. She lies on her starboard side at 36m deep. NE side of Cava island.
James Barrie

#3 - James Barrie

UK, Scotland, Orkney Isles, Scapa Flow

advanced
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The James Barrie was a 40m long steam trawler that sunk 29 march 1969. Hoax Sound, SE of Scapa Flow.
SMS Kronprinz Wilhelm

#4 - SMS Kronprinz Wilhelm

UK, Scotland, Orkney Isles, Scapa Flow

intermediate
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The Kronprinz Wilhelm was 177m long Koenig class vessel. She was launched on 21st Feb 1914 at the Germania Yard in Kiel. She sank on 21st June 1919. She lays nearly upside down in 38 meters of water. The highest point of her upturned keel is about 12 metres from the surface. NE side of Cava island. SMS Kronprinz Wilhelm is also known as Kronprinz.
SMS Cöln

#5 - SMS Cöln

UK, Scotland, Orkney Isles, Scapa Flow

intermediate
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The SMS Cöln was built in Hamburg by Blohm & Voss and launched in 1916. It was a sistership of the Dresden light cruiser. The boat was scuttled on 21st June 1919. This 5600 ton light cruiser is 155.5m long! It is quite impossible to dive the entire wreck in a single dive. The penetration is easy due to the ease of access, with lots of opportunities to get out. NE of Cava island. SMS Cöln is also known as Koeln, Koln, SMS Cöln II.
Kenmore Point

#6 - Kenmore Point

UK, Scotland, Strathclyde

intermediate
(0)
Usual Loch sealife of squat lobsters, anemones, small wrasse, dogfish, blennies, edible crabs etc. Lots of decaying crap like a car roof, washing machine, corrugated metal. Big gnome collection midway through dive. All upright and in good nick. Finish dive when wall ends and you are in a gently sloping bay to the south (to the right) of the houses. Easy exit through kelp onto a shingle beach. Obviously, you could do the dive from south to north - hence the THERE AND BACK name sometimes given to this dive. Loch Fyne. Park at the space on the right looking down towards Kenmore village there is space for 5 cars. Before the houses turn left down to the bay. Kit up on the rocks on the right and head out to the left. Underwater, turn left and head out to 16 meters, this is the top of the cliff face.
Tabarka

#7 - Tabarka

UK, Scotland, Orkney Isles, Scapa Flow

beginner
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The Tabarka is a 20m long wreck. She was build in 1909 in Rotterdam, and sank in 1944. She lays amongst kelp forests. It's a great second dive. Burra Sound, between Graemsay island and Hoy island. Tabarka is also known as The Pollux.
Akka Wreck

#8 - Akka Wreck

UK, Scotland, Strathclyde

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"History The Akka was built in Gothenburg, Sweden, in July 1942. Registered in Stockholm, measuring 133 metres in length with a beam of 17 metres and a draught of 7.75 metres. She was a cargo ship with six large holds covered by eight hatches. Her main deck was steel plated with a shelter deck beneath She was capable of speeds up to 12.5 knots, driven by 85 lbs. of pressure from two six cylinder oil engines. Her net weight was 3,053 tons with a gross weight of 5,409 tons. Amidships was her main superstructure above the engine room, this consisted of the galley, crew's mess rooms, hospital room. Behind these were the 1st and 2nd Engineers and Chief Engineers cabins. Flights of stairs on either side of the hull, led up to the lounge and saloon, to the sides around the funnel housing were officers cabins. Her main mast rose up from the rear of this. The next deck up being the boat deck where two lifeboats were swung from davits either side of the funnel, for'ard were the Captains quarters, above which the bridge deck was situated. The Akka came to grief after the steering failed following a course change, the engines were stopped, but the momentum carried her well on to the Gantock Rocks in the Firth of Clyde. The rocks ripped open her hull from hold No.2. The Captain tried to go astern, this only compounded the damage by increasing the hole to include the engine room. Within 3 or 4 minutes she heeled over and sank. Lifeboats did not have time to clear the suction, and the waves helped by the explosions from the boilers, sunk a number of them. Three crew went down with her, three later died and there were 27 survivors Diving The Akka lies in the position 55 56 43.0N 04 54 20.0W. On an even keel to the Northwest side of Dunoon Bank, she lies on a muddy slope facing down river. The Cardinal navigation buoy marking the main shipping channel is about 50 metres Southwest of the Akka's stern. At low water the depth to the bow is about 16 metres and the stern 24 metres. In 1962 a two boat drag wire cleared the waters above the Akka to a depth of approximately 14 metres. The best time to dive the Akka is at high water slack on a neap tide. In mid run the tidal stream can reach up to 2 knots around Dunoon Bank. Visibility can be as good as 10 metres, but still a little gloomy, so a good torch is essential. The holds do not carry anything of interest as she was transporting iron ore at the time of the sinking. The gunwales rise up about three metres from the main deck of the Akka, which affords you some protection against the current. The broken derrick stumps, now covered with sea life, indicate their position before the clearance sweep. Ropes and cables are strewn over the side supporting more sea life. The accommodation quarters amidships are left as a skeleton frame work, as much of the plating and the decking has rotted away. Great care must be taken as the frame work is now rotting and can easily collapse. It is possible to drop down into the hold in front of the bridge and exit through the hole which brought about her demise. One of the derricks has fallen across forward holds numbers two and three, this can be used as a good guide to lead the way to shallower water. Silt can cause a problem inside the wreck, so great care should be taken by properly equipped divers. Many dives can be made due to the size of the wreck." Source: http://www.admiral.org.uk/the_akka.htm Northwest side of Dunoon Bank
Twin Wrecks

#9 - Twin Wrecks

UK, Scotland, Strathclyde

beginner
(0)
From the shore head up the loch a bit, used to be an old pontoon which you could use as a reference and lining up with a big buoy on the far shore drop down to 10m and head out from shore to hopefully hit the wreck. To yachts are wrecked here, connected by a rope from the bow of the deepest one. Otherwise it's a sandy bottom with not much to see. Visibility is generally poor but enough to take a look around the wrecks if/when you find them. Fishing line is a hazard in this area as shore fishing is popular at this beach. Due to it's proximity to Faslane Naval Facility the MOD Police will pay a visit to ask a few questions. Keep on their good side by telephoning ahead and letting them know where you are diving. Beach at the side of the road with some parking at the railing which overlooks the beach. Twin Wrecks is also known as Five Wrecks.
SS Breda

#10 - SS Breda

UK, Scotland, Highlands and Islands

intermediate
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Sister Ship of the SS Thistlegorm also sunk. The Thistlegorm is in the Red Sea. Large holds that offer safe penetration. there are more options for penetration but low visibility make this more dangerous. A few fatalities have been recorded from divers penetrating this wreck. Plenty to see on the outside of this wreck and it is a huge ship that sits upright on the sandy sea bed. Ardmucknish Bay, Argyll
Isle of Cumbrae

#11 - Isle of Cumbrae

UK, Scotland, Strathclyde

beginner
(0)
Dive into the current, and follow the sea bed out, the further out the deeper you go. Some good Scallop Beds around here Park up next to road on parking bay, the entry point is about 2 meters away. Isle of Cumbrae is also known as Cumbrae.
SS Rondo

#12 - SS Rondo

UK, Scotland, Highlands and Islands

beginner
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Standing almost upright on bow, Rondo lies vertically down cliff-like side of reef. Stern at 9m encrusted with plumose anemones. Mainmast base at 25m. Mast lies down centre of wreck. Bow section at 38m. Forward holds silted up. Beware nitrogen narcosis in steep descent down wreck. Can be seen abutting rocky islet at low tide. SS Rondo is also known as Rondo.
The Meldon

#13 - The Meldon

UK, Scotland, Highlands and Islands

beginner
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Steamship. Sank in March 3rd, 1917 by mines laid from the UB-78. After striking the mine the Meldon ran to Loch Buie to put ashore. It is unclear exactly what occurred but the crew were safely put ashore and the wreck sand with its stern toward the shore. Stern most intact part with fragmentation moving forward. The bow section itself rises vertically 5-6 metres from the seabed. Loch Buie. By boat. The tip of the rudder post is visible from the surface at low tide. Tree showing above the skyline in the V of the hills directly behind the site align with the larger of two white tipped rocks on the shoreline to provide the transit should it be required. Can be dived on any state of the tide. The Meldon is also known as Meldon.
Shuna Wreck

#14 - Shuna Wreck

UK, Scotland, Highlands and Islands

beginner
(0)
The Shuna lies intact and upright on a silty sea bed only 200 metres from the shore, so could theoretically be attempted by energetic divers as a shore dive. The silt is easily stirred, which is something to consider if penetrating the wreck and if there have been lots of divers on it during the day. The ships coal cargo has mostly been removed leaving the now very silty holds nearly empty. The main deck is at 25 metres and remains intact all the way to the stern. Inside the boiler and engine can be seen and there are masts still intact and large cargo and anchor winches. The rudder propeller is also in place and unusually, there is a spare propeller is lying on the deck. There are plenty of fish on this wreck, a few Congers, Fisherman's Fingers, star fish, sea urchins and sponges. A cooker has also been discarded in the wreck! Launch can be from Oban, Lochaline or Tobermory. Oban
Hispania Wreck

#15 - Hispania Wreck

UK, Scotland, Highlands and Islands

advanced
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One of the most amazing wreck dives in Scotland. Viz usually excellent, plenty of marine life. Ship still in very good shape despite years of tides and corrosive salty waters. In 1954 after hitting a reef during a storm, the Hispania sank taking down the Captain with it; all other crew members were rescued. It now lies in an upright position, with the engine room and deck all penetrable. The propeller has been salvaged and the cargo is not of much interest, but the dive is still enjoyable. There is a lot of life and the wreck is covered in orange and white anemones, sponges, fish and starfish. The Hispania can only be dived only on slack, launch can be from Oban, Lochaline or Tobermory. Sound of Mull. Permanent shot on wreck.
Thesis Wreck

#16 - Thesis Wreck

UK, Scotland, Highlands and Islands

intermediate
(0)
The Thesis lies only 50 metres form the shore of Rubha an Ridre, so could theoretically be dived without a boat. The Thesis hit a reef at Innimore Point in bad weather, sinking four hours later once the crew had abandoned ship. Inside the wreck are four holds which have a cargo of iron. The hull is mostly just a skeleton, but the wheel house is in tact. This is usually a pretty wreck to dive, but if the visibility is low it becomes very dark and can look rather sinister. Amongst the wreckage, look out for the engine, boilers and anchor winch, but the propeller and rudder are have been removed. The bow is at 12m, so should be left until the end of the dive. There can be a strong current flowing through the wreck, so be cautious if entering it. Launch can be from Oban, Lochaline or Tobermory. Oban
Garvellachs

#17 - Garvellachs

UK, Scotland, Highlands and Islands

intermediate
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These islands create an area of outstanding beauty above and below the surface, with exceptional water clarity. Complex tides are a feature of this area. However, it is usually possible to find on side or another of the islands to dive on. Some of the drifts through the sounds between the islands are exhilarating and take you past amazing jewel anemone covered walls which are bristling with life. Often see golden eagles on the cliffs above whilst kitting up. By boat. Follow GPS coordinates and pick a likely spot diving the walls of the islands.
Big Green Carr

#18 - Big Green Carr

UK, Scotland, Borders

beginner
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A site that can be used to finish off a tank as a second dive or as a shore dive from the harbour. The two large rocks, the Green Carrs can be navigated around, then the dive can finish heading back to the harbour wall through the kelp beds. The Carrs have a sandy seabed and small walls covered in soft growth and kelp. Can be dived as a second dive from a boat or from the ahbour wall via a surface swim.
Barrel of Butter

#19 - Barrel of Butter

UK, Scotland, Orkney Isles, Scapa Flow

beginner
(0)
Barrel of Butter is a 0-star rated scuba dive and snorkel destination in UK, Scotland, Orkney Isles, Scapa Flow which is accessible from shore based on 0 ratings.
SMS Dresden

#20 - SMS Dresden

UK, Scotland, Orkney Isles, Scapa Flow

intermediate
(0)
The SMS Dresden was a light cuiser class vessel. She was built at Kiel and launched April 1917. She was attacked by a British submarine and sunk in August 1917. The wreck of the Dresden lies in 35 metres of water on her portside. The Dresden was name-ship for the Dresden II class, and rests on her port side in water ranging from 25-45m. Although the hull is well preserved, the weather deck of the Dresden is collapsing to port, exposing the underside and burying the forward armaments in the mud of the area. Built in Kiel and launched on 25 April 1917, she was scuttled at 1130 hrs on 21 June 1919. Displacing 5,600 tons and 156m (512 ft) long, she was the heaviest of the light cruisers in the fleet, carrying 2.5" thick armour, and armed with eight 5.9" guns. E side of Cava island, just few mines off Embden.
Conger Ali

#21 - Conger Ali

UK, Scotland, Strathclyde

beginner
(0)
Very popular Loch Long dive site and easy to see why. The shore access is particularly good, especially when compared to some other sites in the area (i.e. Twin Piers or The Caves). Parking is available further along the road or you can pull in near the dive site (again, beware the traffic on the road at this site). Follow the rocks from the shore out and down to 6m, turn left and travel parallel to the shore working your way down to 16-20m to meet the bottom of the first reef. From here either start working your way along the reef or head down to the second reef. A good boulder reef for finding Conger Eels, Edible Crabs, Balin Wrasse, the occasional Lobster and the usual sea loch creatures (squat lobsters, hermits, velvet swimming crabs, starfish etc.). Rocks are covered in peacock worms, sea squirts, plumrose anemones and sea loch anemones. Easy shore access. Beware the traffic on the road as it's the only straight section for a while and popular place for overtaking. Conger Ali is also known as Conger Alley, Artgarten Reef, Conger reef, Ali's reef, Jenny's reef, Ardgartan reef.
SMS Markgraf

#22 - SMS Markgraf

UK, Scotland, Orkney Isles, Scapa Flow

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SMS Markgraf was a battleship of the Kaiserliche Marine, the German Imperial Navy. She was the third of four König class battleship built, weighing 25,388 tons and having a length of 175 m, 30 m at the beam and a draft of 9 m. She was powered by three turbines developing 46,000 hp (34 MW) each yielding a maximum speed of 22 knots. Her armament consisted of ten 305 mm guns, fourteen 150 mm guns, six 85 mm guns and five 500 mm torpedo tubes. She carried a crew of 1136 men and officers. The Markgraf was built at the AG Weser shipyard at Bremen. She was launched on 4 June 1913 and officially completed on 1 October 1914. She served in the Third Battle Squadron and took part in the Battle of Jütland on 31 May 1916. Her final fight occurred in Scapa Flow, where she was scuttled. A group of Royal Marines killed the captain, Walter Schumann and the chief officer Hermann Dittman while trying to prevent the scuttling. On 21 June 1919, SMS Markgraf vanished beneath the surface. The dive site of the SMS Markgraf lies inside Scapa Flow, in the Orkney Islands at (58° 53′31″N, 3° 9′55″W). The starboard side of the hull lies at 24 m and the port side at 45 m. Source: Wikipedia.org NE side of Cava island