Top Snorkeling and Scuba Diving in Broward County

Ready to check out the best sites in Broward County for scuba diving, snorkeling, shore diving, free diving or other ocean activities? Zentacle has 25 dive sites, snorkel spots, beaches, and more. Discover hand-curated maps, along with reviews and photos from nature lovers like you. No matter what you're looking for, you can find a diverse range of the best ocean activities in Broward County to suit your needs.
Broward County dive site map
Lauderdale by the Sea

#1 - Lauderdale by the Sea

Florida, USA East

Unrated
(42)
The very best shore dive place on the East Coast I have ever dove at has been Lauderdale by the Sea. I only made it out to the first reef but it was incredible. That should be your first stop.
Pompano Beach

#2 - Pompano Beach

Florida, USA East

Unrated
(5)
Pompano Beach, located between Ft. Lauderdale and Palm Beach gives you the best of both worlds, small town charm with big city access. Pompano has some of the best diving in Florida. Pompano Beach is no longer diving's best kept secret! Scuba Diving and Snorkeling in Pompano Beach is extremely popul;ar because of the close proximity of world class wreck and reef dives. The majority of the wreck dives on the Gold Coast are located just outside Hillsboro Inlet, Making Pompano Beach the "Wreck Capitol" of Florida.
South Beach Park a.k.a Yankee Clipper Rocks

#3 - South Beach Park a.k.a Yankee Clipper Rocks

Florida, USA East

Unrated
(1)
The first tier of the Fort Lauderdale reef is located about 75-100 feet off shore. Lots of sea fans here, along with other coral growth. Juvenile nurse sharks seen here (I have the pics to prove it!) along with other juvenile fish. Max depth of the 1st reef is about 14 ft max, (average 10). This parking lot is right on the beach. All you have to do is gear up and walk across the beach in. All day parking is $6.00, and the lot has many freshwater showers. Also a picnic area with charcoal grills, and many restaurants, bars and shops within walking distance. A dive shop is located almost right near the entrance to the park on A1A. Lifeguard towers are dotted along the beach. Most lifeguards prefer if you dive during off peak hours (before 10AM and after 5PM). A dive flag is required by local law. This site is best accessed from the South Beach Park parking lot, located off A1A on Fort Lauderdale Beach. South Beach lot is right at the split (where A1A becomes one way), otherwise known as South Atlantic Blvd / Seabrease Blvd. To get there you can take SE 17th St, east to A1A, north to the parking lot, or you can take E Las Olas Blvd to A1A, south to the parking lot.
Hillsboro Inlet Jetty

#4 - Hillsboro Inlet Jetty

Florida, USA East

Unrated
(1)
I snorkel the outside part of the jetty (the side facing AWAY from the inlet, towards the beach, and shielded from the tidal currents) all the time. It's an easy swim right off the beach, and drops off quickly to about 20-30 feet of water. Lots of hard corals on boulders on the deeper sections; some ledges; some rubble, etc on bottom. Depending on the season, barracuda, a few jacks and even occasional snook. Always parrotfish, blowfish, stonefish, schools of minnows and pinfish. Some caveats: its dangerous and illegal to swim on the inlet-side of the jetty; currents are very swift, the inlet is narrow, and there's a near-constant flow of yachts, cigarette boats, and day-boaters going through. Also, for max visibility, try to time your dive 3-4 hours after the incoming tide. That brings in fresh clear ocean water (visibility typically 20-30 feet) and leaves time for the tide to push back all the tea-colored water that comes out of the Intercostals Waterway on the outgoing tide. From I-95, exit at Atlantic Blvd (Pompano Beach) and drive east all the way to the coastal beach highway, A1A (about 3-4 miles). Turn left (north) up A1A about 2 miles; just past the traffic light at 14th Street is a small public beach park (at 16th Street), with metered parking, bathrooms + outdoor shower. From there, it's about a quarter-mile walk along the beach to the Inlet (you can't miss it because the Hillsboro lighthouse is on the other side).
Dania Beach

#5 - Dania Beach

Florida, USA East

Unrated
(8)
Dania Beach is a 4.375-star rated scuba dive and snorkel destination in Florida, USA East which is accessible from shore based on 8 ratings.
Dr. Von D. Mizell-Eula Johnson State Park

#6 - Dr. Von D. Mizell-Eula Johnson State Park

Florida, USA East

Unrated
(4)
Dr. Von D. Mizell-Eula Johnson State Park is formerly known as John U. Lloyd Beach Park. If conditions are not great, don't even bother visibility is bad here compared to some nearby areas. When I went I could not even see my feet in waist deep water. I swam out anyway, and at about 500 yards out I at least could see bottom, and visibility was around 20 feet. I was looking for a famed ledge that follows the edge of the reef, and I have heard is about 6 feet. I never found it because of poor visibility. What I did find was an endless stretch of reef much like vista park. There were many soft corals, and fish of all kinds, including a few large grouper, butterfly fish, doctor fish, porgy, and a bunch of other fish from I-95 get off on Griffin Road in the Ft. Lauderdale area. Go east until US1 then go South until Dania Beach Blvd (here you should start seeing signs directing you to the park) go east on Dania Beach until you see a sign telling you to turn right to get into the park. After passing a gate to get into the park, where they make you pay five dollars, park in the first lot on the right. Follow the boardwalk to the ocean. The reef starts a long ways out, something like 500 yards.
Deerfield Ledges

#7 - Deerfield Ledges

Florida, USA East

Unrated
(4)
I dove here in January 2002. I remember a large series of ledges inhabited by large numbers of fish. I really did not remember this as being as impressive as north Deerfield ledges were, but while I did not see any, I was told this is a good place to look for lobster. get off of the 95 at Hillsboro Blvd in Deerfield Beach. Go east to the A1A. Then go south on the A1A until you get to SE 5th Street. Once there go east for a short distance, then go S on S. Ocean way Follow this road, it will curve to the east. there will be parking at meters near the Cove Beach Club
Barracuda Reef

#8 - Barracuda Reef

USA, Florida, Fort Lauderdale

beginner
(1)
Short boat ride out just out of Pt. Everglades and to the South. There are 29 mooring buoys to pick up. recommend picking up one of the first few
Hollywood Beach

#9 - Hollywood Beach

Florida, USA East

Unrated
(1)
Hollywood Beach is a 3.0-star rated scuba dive and snorkel destination in Florida, USA East which is accessible from shore based on 1 ratings.
Commercial Pier Reef

#10 - Commercial Pier Reef

USA, Florida, Fort Lauderdale

beginner
(0)
From the beach, get about 100 yards from the right side of the pier and go straight out for about another 100 yds. Commercial Pier Reef is also known as Anglins Pier Reef.
Dania Erojacks Reef

#11 - Dania Erojacks Reef

USA, Florida, Fort Lauderdale

beginner
(0)
Dania Erojacks Reef is a 0-star rated scuba dive and snorkel destination in USA, Florida, Fort Lauderdale which is accessible from shore based on 0 ratings.
Lighthouse Ledge

#12 - Lighthouse Ledge

USA, Florida, Fort Lauderdale

beginner
(0)
Pompano Beach, Florida. Close to Hillsboro Inlet
Copenhagen Wreck

#13 - Copenhagen Wreck

USA, Florida, Fort Lauderdale

beginner
(0)
"The 325-foot single screw steamer Copenhagen was built in 1898 just two years before she ran aground on the rock ledge out from Pompano. She was caring a cargo of coal to Havana at the time of mishap. This is one of Florida's favorite historical shipwreck dives. On May 20 1900, the vessel had departed Philadelphia, laden with almost 5,000 tons of coal and a crew of 26, bound for Havana, Cuba. As the vessel passed the lighthouse, Captain William Jones estimated the ship's position as about one and three- quarter miles offshore and ordered a change in course to SSE to keep the ship at least a mile and a half offshore as it past by West Palm Beach. At around 4:20 am, Captain Jones retired, leaving the chief officer in charge. He left instructions the keep the vessel one and half mile offshore. There was no indication of what was about to happen to the steamship. The steamer SS Copenhagen was built in Sunderland, England, and launched in February 1898. The steel hulled ship was 324 feet long, 47 feet wide and more than 25 feet deep. Like many of the ship built in the late 1800s, the vessel was built with an inner and outer hull. At around 9:00 am on May 26, the vessel suddenly crashed hard into the Pompano Drop-off, an eastern facing ledge that rises to 15 feet of the surface from a sandy bottom in 31 feet. The ship's engines were immediately ordered stopped. Captain Jones ordered full reverse. The engines kicked into reverse but the ship didn't move. In the attempt to free the vessel, a large anchor was deployed to no avail. Two days later, a salvage ship showed up to help unload the cargo and to try to pull the Copenhagen from its predicament. Extra people from shore were employed to speed up the recovery of the coal. The loss of the ship was valued at $250,000 and the remaining cargo was valued at $12,500. Jones was found to be at fault for the incident. Examiners found that he did not employ proper navigation; and that he did not used his sounding lead. A sounding lead is a device that ships used to determine the depth of the water. Because of his willingness to cooperate during the investigation and his excellent work record, his master certificate wasn't revoked. The wreck of the Copenhagen was visible above the water for more than 40 years. The site was used for target practice by navy fighters stationed nearby. In June 1994, the site was named as Florida's fifth underwater archaeological preserve. A plaque commemorating this distinction is next to a large limestone boulder just to the south of the wreck. Even though the site is ideal for the novice diver, many experienced divers have had a wonderful time exploring the Copenhagen. " Source: http://dixiediver.com/shipwreck.htm#COPENHAGEN About 1/2 mile due east of the large blue water tower on Pompano.
Guy Harvey

#14 - Guy Harvey

USA, Florida, Fort Lauderdale

intermediate
(0)
Ex-Haitian freighter "Lady Kimberly" 185-foot long.Renamed in honor of jamaican marine life artist Guy Harvey.Sunk in 1997as an artificial reef. Out of Pompano Beach Guy Harvey is also known as MV Lady Kimberly.
Capt Dan Wreck

#15 - Capt Dan Wreck

USA, Florida, Fort Lauderdale

intermediate
(0)
This ship was a Coast Guard buoy tender Hollyhock. It was sunk as an artificial reef February, 20 1990 in memory of Captain Dan Garnsey. She now lies upright in 110 feet. The wheelhouse is 70 feet and her deck is at 90 feet. She is intact with large access holes providing certified wreck divers easy opportunity for penetration. South of the Jay Dorman Artificial Reef. 1.5 mile from shore, just outside the third reef line. Capt Dan Wreck is also known as Hollyhock, Capt Dan Garnsey.
LBTS Biorock reef

#16 - LBTS Biorock reef

USA, Florida, Fort Lauderdale

beginner
(0)
The LBTS Biorock project is a one of a kind reel restoration project in the USA. It utilizes a low voltage electric current supplied by solar panels to accelerate reef growth. This site is very easy to locate just under the buoys that support the solar panels. Please remember, this is a fragile reef and touching coral or sponges could stress or even kill them. This is a great site for photography too! Easy beach access. If you go by boat, be careful not to anchor on top of the reef. There is plenty of open sandy bottom just East of the Biorock to anchor.
Mercedes I

#17 - Mercedes I

USA, Florida, Fort Lauderdale

intermediate
(0)
She was originally built in 1951 and called the Jacob Rusch. This 198-foot freighter was sunk as an artificial reef site off Fort Lauderdale on March 30, 1985. The Mercedes is the most famous wrecks off the east coast of Florida. Located just offshore of Fort Lauderdale. Mercedes I is also known as Jacob Rusch.
Tenneco Towers

#18 - Tenneco Towers

USA, Florida, Fort Lauderdale

intermediate
(0)
Tenneco Towers, were placed at their current location in October, 1985. This is one of the most popular dives on the southeast coast. The oil rigs were originally used in the Gulf of Mexico for oil and gas exploration. Tenneco Oil Co. transported the one time oil platform by barge around the Florida Keys and placed them at their present site. The area consists of 3 sites: - West Tenneco at 105' depth (Adavnced level), - East Tenneco at 115' depth (Adavnced level) - The Deep Tenneco's at a depth of 185' and 205' (Rescue/Trimix level). Depending on tides, this site can have stong currents. N of Miami, S of Ft Lauderdale (Northernmost dive site for dive operators located in Miami). Tenneco Towers is also known as Tenneco Oil Platforms.
Ancient Mariner

#19 - Ancient Mariner

USA, Florida, Fort Lauderdale

beginner
(0)
This is a beautiful wreck dive off the Miami/Ft. Lauderdale coast of Florida. It's worth diving because it is a recreational dive and contains plenty of coral and fish. Ancient Mariner is oned for your diving log. Sunk in 1991 as an artificial reef. In front of Hillsboro Beach. Ancient Mariner is also known as Nemesis.
Bill Boyd

#20 - Bill Boyd

USA, Florida, Fort Lauderdale

advanced
(0)
The Bill Boyd is a deep dive only for Technical divers. The coral and fish of the wreck are great. Depth limits the bottom time, but it's worth diving this deep. She is a 211 foot German freighter (built in Hamburg in 1964) that was sunk as an artificial reef on July 18, 1986. Today she sits upright in 265 feet of water. The Bill Boyd is accessible only by dive boat. Bill Boyd is also known as Heino, Maude Wonsild, Mauds Isa, Hem Berto, Marilyn, Nata.
Marriott Reef

#21 - Marriott Reef

USA, Florida, Fort Lauderdale

Unrated
(0)
Marriott Reef is also known as DC-3 Wreck.
Hog Heaven

#22 - Hog Heaven

USA, Florida, Fort Lauderdale

beginner
(0)
Hog Heaven is a 180-foot barge that flipped upside down while being deployed as an artificial reef. It was sunk in 1996. Nearby: - 30 feet north are the remains of the Pacific Reef Lighthouse, and a small sail boat - 200 feet NNe rests the 120-foot barge Wayne in 70 feet of water Approximately one mile offshore
Jim Atria Wreck

#23 - Jim Atria Wreck

USA, Florida, Fort Lauderdale

intermediate
(0)
This 240-foot Dutch freighter was built in 1961. 4.5 miles north of the Port Everglades Cut. Jim Atria Wreck is also known as Poinciana.
Hall Of Fame Moorings

#24 - Hall Of Fame Moorings

USA, Florida, Fort Lauderdale

beginner
(0)
Many ledge and undercuts with great sealife. 6 miles north of Port Everglades Cut; out from and slightly north of the Anglin Pier at Lauderdale-by-the-Sea. The dive area is marked by 9 buoys.
Tracy

#25 - Tracy

USA, Florida, Fort Lauderdale

beginner
(0)
132-foot oil rig supply boat sunk in 1999 as an artificial reef. Tracy is also known as Ken Vitale.