Top Snorkeling and Scuba Diving in Florida

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Epcot Dive Quest

Florida, USA East

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(24)
EPCOT Dive Quest is an exciting experience offered at the Living Seas at EPCOT Center Walt Disney World in Orlando, FL which gives you the chance to perform on our underwater stage- a 6 million gallon aquarium which houses over 65 different species of fish, sharks, turtles, and stingrays. The program, which lasts for about 2 ½ hours, begins with a backstage tour of the Living Seas- a functioning marine research facility. You will learn about marine wildlife conservation and Disney’s efforts all around the world to protect our oceans. After watching a short film about how the Living Seas was created, it is time for the ultimate dive. We provide all of the gear, while you supply all of the fun when you SCUBA dive in our main aquatic environment for 40 minutes. You’ll be part of the Disney show as you get to dive in a place that millions have visited but few have been able to go beneath its surface. All guests are given a T-shirt and a certificate of completion at the conclusion of the program. Certified divers ages 10 and up are welcome. The cost is $140 per person (group rates available- other discounts may apply). This includes all gear, the dive, refreshments, a T-shirt, certificate, and a dive log stamp. Equipment includes mask, fins, tank, buoyancy compensator, regulator, weightbelt, and a 2.5 mm shorty wetsuit. Water temperature is in the mid-70s. Personal masks are acceptable. To make a reservation for Dive Quest, please call 407-WDW-TOUR (407-939-8687) In addition to Dive Quest, we also offer two programs for non-certified guests- Seas Aqua Tours and Dolphins in Depth. Aqua Tours involves surface-assisted-snorkeling in our main environment, while Dolphins in Depth involves in-depth information and interaction time with our two resident bottle-nosed dolphins.
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Rainbow River

Florida, USA East

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(13)
Spring fed river, incredibly clear. In addition to abundant underwater wildlife, see springs bubbling into river (looks like bubbling sand). Easy snorkel since you get taken upriver in a boat and "float" down. From Orlando - Approximately 83 miles ( time 1 hour & 40 min) 1. Take I-4 East or West or Florida Turnpike North exit #77 2. Go North on the Florida Turnpike approximately 55 miles 3. Turnpike will turn to I-75 North 4. Take I-75 North for 10 miles to Hwy.484 exit # 341 turn left 5. Take Hwy. 484 West to Dunnellon Fl. Approximately 20 miles to Hwy 41 6. Go right , North 3 miles to SW 99th Place. Turn right at light go 1 mile cross RR track then go left after crossings, 1 mile on right is KP Hole County Park
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Crystal River

Florida, USA East

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(7)
Crystal River is a fresh water river complex fed by warm freshwater springs. It offers a variety of fish (mullets, catfish, tarpon, etc.) and many Manatees. I found the manatees were friendly and unintimidated by SCUBA. Sadly, all of the manatees I saw had suffered multiple prop injuries. If you do boat in manatee territory, please look out for them. This is an easy site to dive and offers a good environment for beginners. Maximum depth is around 40 feet. The water is in the mid 70s to low 80s year round and I was comfortable diving in a 3-mil skin. I know it can be shore-dived, but, I don't know a lot of the details of shore diving this site. I dove it from a small inflatable. I know it's in the North Western section of the Florida Peninsula, and, I believe it's a state park. Sorry I don't have more information. I only dove there once.
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Blue Heron Bridge

Florida, USA East

beginner
(24)
You can dive either East or West of the Park. Do not enter the boat lanes! Exit 57 near mile marker 75, North of West Palm Beach. Head East, cross over the bridge until you see Phil Foster Park.
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Morrison Springs

Florida, USA East

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(11)
Once a commercial dive operation site, Morrison Springs is now a Walton County recreation park. Bought by the State of Florida in 2004, it is now a no fee area. The dive area is an about 250 foot wide spring basin surrounded by a grove of cypress and other trees. Entry is sand gently sloped entry into the water. Water levels vary, but at approximately 18 to 25 feet, there is a training platform resting on the bottom of the basin. In the center of the basin, there is a funnel shaped entrance to the cavern area. A large tree trunk rests across this opening. Down the funnel is a small cavern room at about 35 feet and a large cavern room at about 50 feet. Depths can reach about 90 feet in the large cavern room. Water temps stay constant at about 65-68 degrees all year due to the spring. Facilities include bench areas, a bath house and restrooms, a covered picnic pavilion, a freshwater wash-down shower and some large floodlights. The area is also a popular launch place for local fishermen, who will launch boats in the same area as the divers. For this reason, a dive flag should be towed with the diver while in the dive basin. Caution should be noted anytime you surface as boaters don't always follow dive flag rules. As of October 2005, the county is meeting and planning upgrades to the facilities and also a separate boat launch area to separate divers and boaters. While this won't keep all boaters out of the basin, it will create a much safer dive environment. Nearest Dive Shop and Air Fills: Vortex Springs - http://www.vortexspring.com/ 10 miles away. Other sites that have information or pictures or maps. <br>http://www.dep.state.fl.us/springs/locator/Morrison.htm <br>http://underwaterflorida.homestead.com/morrison.html <br>http://www.floridacaves.com/morrison.htm <br>http://tfn.net/Springs/Morrison.htm Location: South of Ponce de Leon, Florida GPS coordinates N30.6578 W85.9056 Directions: Morrison Spring is south of the town of Ponce de Leon, Florida. Take I-10 and exit at Hwy 81 in Ponce de Leon. Go south on Florida Hwy 81. Turn left (east) on County Road 181. (look for a pavilion/shed in field with a Blue roof) Take CR-181 and turn right onto Morrison Springs Road. You will soon come to a fork in the road. Keep left and proceed to the spring. The road will dead end in the springs parking lot. Google Maps location: http://maps.google.com/maps?q=N30.6578+W85.9056&spn=0.048180,0.095645&t=h&iwloc=A&hl=en
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Alexander Springs

Florida, USA East

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(12)
Cavern Diving West of Deland
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Ginnie Springs

Florida, USA East

Not ranked yet
(17)
Four diveable springs:The Ball Room, Little Devil, Devil's Eye, and Devil's ear 7300 NE Ginnie Springs Rd; High Springs, Florida 32643; 904 454-2202; M-Th 8 a.m. - 7 p.m. F-S 8 a.m. - 10 p.m. Sun 8.a.m. - 8 p.m. $24 per day to dive
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Lauderdale by the Sea

Florida, USA East

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(41)
The very best shore dive place on the East Coast I have ever dove at has been Lauderdale by the Sea. I only made it out to the first reef but it was incredible. That should be your first stop.
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Forty Fathom Grotto

Florida, USA East

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(2)
40 fathoms deep, spring water, good viz. Platforms to take a break every 15 feet. 40 Fathom Grotto<br>9487 NW 115th Ave<br>Ocala, FL 34482<br> (352) 368-7974
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St. Andrews Jetties, Panama Beach

Florida, USA East

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(18)
1,260-acre coastal park; 110ft, 40ft viz, 60-80DegF; for more information, call St. Andrews State Park at (850) 233-5140<br> <u>Park Fees:</u> Admission Fee--$5.00 per vehicle; $1.00 for the following: Pedestrians, Bicyclists, extra Passengers, Passengers in vehicles with holder of Annual Individual Entrance Permit<br> <u>Facilities:</u> Picnic pavilions, bath-house, restrooms, beach chair rentals (in season), Park store with limited lunch food items for sale plus drinks, snacks and souvenirs. Beach on tidal pool with no waves and beach on main beach area where waves are located. Boat shuttle (fee charged) available to Shell Island (sand island) across channel from park. No facilities on Shell Island.<br> <u>Dive Shop Concession on site:</u> Jetty Dive Shop 850-233-0197 On site air fills when compressor is working. Some rental tanks, but limited availability. Nitrox usually not available.<br> <u>Closest offsite Dive Shop:</u> PC Dive Center at the corner of Front Beach Rd and Thomas Drive just outside the park at the first redlight.<br> <u>Dive Rules:</u> Follow Florida State dive laws. Dive flag required for diving anywhere outside the jetty tidal pool.<br> <u>Best time to dive:</u> At "high slack tide" Check local tide tables for time.<br> <u>Dive Conditions:</u> strong currents can exist due to incoming/outgoing tide. Best time for lowest current and best visibility is at high slack tide. Depths to 65 feet in main channel. Beware of boat traffic above and use a dive flag as required by law. Fishermen sometimes fish on jetty rocks, so beware of line entanglement or being hooked. Best to carry a cutting tool just in case.<br> <u>Accommodations:</u> Camping available at park or hotels/condos available outside park. <u>Hours of Operation:</u> 8:00 AM to sunset<br> <u>Driving Directions:</u> From Hwy 98 turn South on to Hwy 3031 (Thomas Drive) and follow it straight to Hwy 392 and turn left to enter into the gates of St. Andrews State Park. St. Andrews State Park is located approximately 3 miles east of Hwy 392.
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Destin Jetties

Florida, USA East

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(14)
Recently( this February) I did a shore dive at the Destin Jetties in Destin, Florida. I went there because the boat dives were all canceled due to bad weather. Of course that meant there was bad weather at the jetties too but I was so determined to dive in the ocean that weekend. I spent about 12 mins fighting the currents in 6 foot water and went about 9 yards. It was freezing cold and I had about 5 ft of visibility. It was a terrible dive but the locals I talked to said that on good days it can be incredible. I plan to try it again this summer. You are at the mercy of the tides for peek diving conditions. Obviously when I dove that mercy was not available. There are jetties on both the east and west side of the pass - the east side is where people do most of their diving. To reach them, you'll want to get to Gulf Shore Drive and follow it past where it makes an "S" turn. At this point, be on watch for a gravel lane for public parking on the right side of the road. There will also be a single showerhead and a few signs that can be easy to miss marking the trail that leads out to the beach and the East Pass Jetties.
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Vortex Springs

Florida, USA East

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(12)
VORTEX Springs in Ponce De Leon FL. It is a natural spring and mostly around 70 degrees. It boasts Gin Clear vis! There is a cavern there and some swim throughs.
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Weeki Wachee Springs

Florida, USA East

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(4)
Weeki Wachee can best be described as a fresh water spring with a theme park built around it. In between dives you can watch the mermaid show that takes place right there in the spring. Divers must be accompanied by local dive shops with permission to enter and dive. Located on US 19 in the heart of a very small town called Weeki Wachee. It's about an hour and a half north of Tampa, Fl.
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Blue Grotto

Florida, USA East

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(20)
Sink Hole, underwater air bell at 30', underwater lighting system 5390 NE 180th Ave; Williston, Florida 32696; 352 528-5770; 7 days 8 a.m. - 6 p.m.; $27 per day to dive
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Devil's Den

Florida, USA East

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(12)
33 Million year old fossils in an incredible sink hole 5390 NE 180th Ave; Williston, Florida 32696; 352 528-3344;7 days 8 a.m. - 6 p.m.; $27 per day to dive
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John Pennekamp

Florida, USA East

Not ranked yet
(3)
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Vero Beach

Florida, USA East

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(3)
Near Lakeland
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Fort Pierce Inlet State Recreation Area

Florida, USA East

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(3)
The reef at this area consists of several smaller reefs that are parallel to shore. The description of these reefs is similar to Vero Beach but the topography of the outer most reef at Ft. Pierce is more dramatic. The reef can actually be seen from satellite imagery on the Google maps link below. Http://www.google.com/maps?q=Vero+Beach,+FL,+USA&ie=UTF8&ll=27.482823,-80.299201&spn=0.013877,0.022659&t=h&z=16&om=1 Patches of sand exist between the reefs and can be used as navigation aids. The first reef is a couple hundred yards from shore but the outer most reef that faces the ocean has the most fish life and structural variation. Another difference in diving Ft. Pierce as compared to Vero Beach is that parking is plentiful and the facilities are extremely clean and diver friendly including drying racks by the showers-- this is what your fees help pay for. Something to keep in mind diving this area is that it is near an inlet that leads to the intracoastal water way. As such, pay attention to weather and currents for visibility conditions and use a good diver down flag. Furthermore, this is a popular site for surfing for stay cautious during the ascent and surface swim. Ft. Pierce Inlet State Recreation area is located on A1A just before it heads west towards the mainland. A road from the gate house, this is a fee area, leads to several access points on the beach. The reef off the beach is a part of the larger reef that parallels the FL Treasure Coast all the way to just north of Miami - the name Treasure Coast derives from the numerous Spanish galleons that wrecked just offshore on this large reef system spilling their contents on and off the local beaches.
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South Beach Park a.k.a Yankee Clipper Rocks

Florida, USA East

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(1)
The first tier of the Fort Lauderdale reef is located about 75-100 feet off shore. Lots of sea fans here, along with other coral growth. Juvenile nurse sharks seen here (I have the pics to prove it!) along with other juvenile fish. Max depth of the 1st reef is about 14 ft max, (average 10). This parking lot is right on the beach. All you have to do is gear up and walk across the beach in. All day parking is $6.00, and the lot has many freshwater showers. Also a picnic area with charcoal grills, and many restaurants, bars and shops within walking distance. A dive shop is located almost right near the entrance to the park on A1A. Lifeguard towers are dotted along the beach. Most lifeguards prefer if you dive during off peak hours (before 10AM and after 5PM). A dive flag is required by local law. This site is best accessed from the South Beach Park parking lot, located off A1A on Fort Lauderdale Beach. South Beach lot is right at the split (where A1A becomes one way), otherwise known as South Atlantic Blvd / Seabrease Blvd. To get there you can take SE 17th St, east to A1A, north to the parking lot, or you can take E Las Olas Blvd to A1A, south to the parking lot.
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Howard Park Cave Dive

Florida, USA East

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(1)
Thought you might Like to add this to your list of Shore dive sites in Florida This is a wild cave and can be a bit hairy as vis can range from 20 down to < 5 and 65' at the deepest spot I have found. Have Fun --Tim Not so easy to find if you don’t know exactly where it is. And since this winter my markers have been blown off by the storms. The site is listed at http://www.caveatlas.com/systems/system.asp?ID=37
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Hillsboro Inlet Jetty

Florida, USA East

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(1)
I snorkel the outside part of the jetty (the side facing AWAY from the inlet, towards the beach, and shielded from the tidal currents) all the time. It's an easy swim right off the beach, and drops off quickly to about 20-30 feet of water. Lots of hard corals on boulders on the deeper sections; some ledges; some rubble, etc on bottom. Depending on the season, barracuda, a few jacks and even occasional snook. Always parrotfish, blowfish, stonefish, schools of minnows and pinfish. Some caveats: its dangerous and illegal to swim on the inlet-side of the jetty; currents are very swift, the inlet is narrow, and there's a near-constant flow of yachts, cigarette boats, and day-boaters going through. Also, for max visibility, try to time your dive 3-4 hours after the incoming tide. That brings in fresh clear ocean water (visibility typically 20-30 feet) and leaves time for the tide to push back all the tea-colored water that comes out of the Intercostals Waterway on the outgoing tide. From I-95, exit at Atlantic Blvd (Pompano Beach) and drive east all the way to the coastal beach highway, A1A (about 3-4 miles). Turn left (north) up A1A about 2 miles; just past the traffic light at 14th Street is a small public beach park (at 16th Street), with metered parking, bathrooms + outdoor shower. From there, it's about a quarter-mile walk along the beach to the Inlet (you can't miss it because the Hillsboro lighthouse is on the other side).
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Three Sisters Spring

Crystal River, FL

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(1)
Three Sisters Springs is a complex of three spring areas, with many vents and sand boils that help feed Kings Bay, the headwaters of the Crystal River. These springs also constitute one of the most important natural warm-water refuges for the endangered Florida manatee. The site entrance is blocked from boats. Fresh Water fish and turtles. Occasional manatees though diving in the area is limited when there are a high number of manatees present.
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Pompano Beach

Florida, USA East

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(4)
Pompano Beach, located between Ft. Lauderdale and Palm Beach gives you the best of both worlds, small town charm with big city access. Pompano has some of the best diving in Florida. Pompano Beach is no longer diving's best kept secret! Scuba Diving and Snorkeling in Pompano Beach is extremely popul;ar because of the close proximity of world class wreck and reef dives. The majority of the wreck dives on the Gold Coast are located just outside Hillsboro Inlet, Making Pompano Beach the "Wreck Capitol" of Florida.
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Pepper Park

Florida, USA East

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(4)
Great shore dive!! Three series of ledges: 1st.100 yards off shore- 2nd 125 yards - 3rd 175 yards. You will see reef sharks and small fish. Free parking, clean showers and bathrooms! Many places to eat on rt. 1. DON'T FORGET to bring a dive flag! Safety first, diving second!! Fort Pierce! On I-95 exit #138 go east rt.164 {Indrio Rd} Turn right {south} on rt-1. Go over the first causeway bridge to A1A. Then go north about 2 miles. Pepper Park is on your right.
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Dania Beach

Florida, USA East

Not ranked yet
(8)
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Bradenton Beach

Florida, USA East

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(5)
This is an easy beach dive and is especially well suited for beginners owing to ease of water entry and lack of strong currents. Depths are shallow, usually no more than 15 feet, and visibility is usually very good for this type of Gulf dive -- generally about 15 feet. Abundance of small marine life such as small reef fish, crabs, sheepshead, and snook (when they venture out from under the pier). Farther north of the pier (about a mile drive) is the "Molasses Reef" which is essentially the bowsprit of an old molasses steamer that sunk many years ago. All that is left is a small portion of the bow which sticks out of the flat surrounding sand. Not much as far as a "wreck" goes, but small reef fish seem to enjoy it. On the north end of Bradenton Beach near the fishing pier. Take either I-75 or US19 to Bradenton and follow signs for the beach. There is free parking along the beach front as long as you get there early enough.
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Lake Denton

Florida, USA East

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(12)
There is a SCUBA destination in Lake Denton, Florida. This is where my wife and I completed our open water dives for our certification. The visibility is good and there are a lot of fish to see. It is a favorite of the locals and is busy on Saturday, but Sunday it's less crowded. There are lines on the bottom to help navigate. There are also a couple of sunken dinghies. Lake Denton, Florida
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Manatee Springs

Florida, USA East

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(7)
We went there to test out dry suits through DUI. The manatee spring wasn't that fun but the other one right by it (in the same park) was neat, and had a lot of interesting things to look at. The visibility was shot that day since it was so crowded but it still was fun. 11650 N.W. 115th St., Chiefland, Florida 32626,Phone: 352-493-6072
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Venice Beach

Florida, USA East

Not ranked yet
(18)
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Hudson Grotto

Florida, USA East

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(8)
The grotto is used for training, open water diving, and is available for private parties and special events. The Grotto walls are hour glass shaped loaded with solution tubes and other objects to look at. The bottom is dome shaped, and the edges average around 100 - 110 feet in Depth. with the deepest spot, about 155ft in a small opening against the north wall. There are four platforms, Three of them just under the end edge of the dock, and one in the middle of the sink. The three platforms are layered like steps, the first one is at 20ft.,the second at 45 ft. and the third at 60ft. Tied to the white barrel there is a line that runs down to a 100 foot platform which is used for Advance Open Water classes. The Platform sits next to two boats and lines run to an old VW van, and other interesting objects sitting on the bottom. There are several thermo clines, the mid-water temperature can get pretty cold between 40 and 80 feet , however the bottom temperature usually stays in the low 70's. The water is tannic all year, and visibility can really fluctuate with the algae bloom. Cost is usually around 10- $20 for divers depending on visibility. Located one mile North from the intersection of SR 52 and US Hwy 19. Tower Drive is directly across the street from the Castriota Chevy Dealership. Hudson Grotto is on the left side of Tower Drive, just across the street from Scuba West dive shop.
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Vista Park

Florida, USA East

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(3)
This is a real nice dive spot. The reef is huge, I spent two hours there and saw less than a quarter of what is there. The coral life is amazing, soft corals, many several feet tall are everywhere Big heads of hard coral some three or more feet tall are not uncommon. In some areas I saw stag horn corals carpeting the ground. While the fish were not as dense as at gulf stream park, they were much more diverse, I saw almost everything I have seen in south Florida, Angelfish, Damsels, wrasses, parrotfish, a small nurse shark, a small stingray, and a whole lot I could not identify. This is seriously one of the best reefs I have seen this close to shore. From I-95 get off on Oakland Park Blvd in Fort Lauderdale follow that east to the A1A. Go south along the A1A until 27th street. Go east on 27th. Then turn left (north) on Atlantic and drive about two blocks, Vista park parking will be on the right. There are cheap meters, 25cents an hour as of Jan 2004. Get into the water anywhere along the beach, the reef starts just after the Buoys
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The Breakers

Florida, USA East

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(3)
This is one of the best, if not the best shore dive anywhere within a hundred miles of here. The water is usually more clear than nearby sites, and the variety, and number of fish and coral is pretty much unmatched. I have seen French, and Blue Angelfish, Parrotfish, Moray Eels, Porgy, Puffers, Damsels, and a whole lot I could not identify. Some of the ledges there get up to six feet, and are quite impressive. There is less hard corals here than at Vista park, but more sponges and similar numbers of soft coral. From the I-95 get off at Palm Beach Lakes blvd in west palm beach. Go east until Dixie highway(US1) then go south until Quadrille (also called Royal Poinciana in places) go east on this across the intercoastal. Then go north on N County Road, take a quick right onto Sunset avenue. At the end of this road there is two hour parking, park there and swim directly out, there are a few reefs that go as deep as 25 feet.
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West Palm Beach

Florida, USA East

Not ranked yet
(4)
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Dr. Von D. Mizell-Eula Johnson State Park

Florida, USA East

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(4)
Dr. Von D. Mizell-Eula Johnson State Park is formerly known as John U. Lloyd Beach Park. If conditions are not great, don't even bother visibility is bad here compared to some nearby areas. When I went I could not even see my feet in waist deep water. I swam out anyway, and at about 500 yards out I at least could see bottom, and visibility was around 20 feet. I was looking for a famed ledge that follows the edge of the reef, and I have heard is about 6 feet. I never found it because of poor visibility. What I did find was an endless stretch of reef much like vista park. There were many soft corals, and fish of all kinds, including a few large grouper, butterfly fish, doctor fish, porgy, and a bunch of other fish from I-95 get off on Griffin Road in the Ft. Lauderdale area. Go east until US1 then go South until Dania Beach Blvd (here you should start seeing signs directing you to the park) go east on Dania Beach until you see a sign telling you to turn right to get into the park. After passing a gate to get into the park, where they make you pay five dollars, park in the first lot on the right. Follow the boardwalk to the ocean. The reef starts a long ways out, something like 500 yards.
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Phosphate Dock

Florida, USA East

advanced
(4)
Dive 2 hours before high slack tide (2 hours is all you get). BEST TALK TO THE LOCALS. VERY DANGEROUS PLACE. If it's done during tarpoon season, if the tide don't get you, the great whites will! Never actually dove it, because I didn't know the tide tables, and it's better I didn't! School of over 300 Great Whites off shore (found out later from the dive shop). It's not as great as when the dock was used years ago, but fish still school there. It's about 40' deep, and not for the beginner. -- Mad Marl Go to the end of the island of Boca Grande. Park in public parking. Follow the beach around the point. Find Phosphate Dock (you can't miss it!)
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Bahia Honda State Park

Florida, USA East

intermediate
(4)
The bridge at Bahia Honda State Park on Bahia Honda Key is a shallow (8 - 11 feet) but a good dive. It's almost too shallow for scuba but the viz is not quite good enough for prime snorkeling. Pull a dive flag and stay out of the boat channels. There's are lots of fish in numbers and variety, crabs and lobster and small nurse sharks eating the crabs and lobster. Look closely around the bridge pilings and there is grass and soft corals on the bottom. Bahia State Park is on Hwy 1 in the Florida Keys. Exit into the park and follow the park roads around to the base of the bridge.
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Troy Springs

Florida, USA East

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(5)
80' Spring with a moderate outflow. About 60' of rock wall to explore on the way down and up. Also a cypress flat out to the Suwannee River Very easy to enter. There are two entry points from the dock.
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Paradise Springs

Florida, USA East

Not ranked yet
(5)
For divers of all levels. Follow U.S. 27 south to Williston
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Regina Wreck Or Molasses Barge

Florida, USA East

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(5)
Sunk in 1940 after it was washed ashore in a storm sits the Regina. Local divers also know this wreck as the Molasses barge. I dove this site which is very convenient due to the fact that it is a shore dive across the street from a dive shop. You must cross a street and about 100yds of sand. Once you hit the water, it is about a 100yd swim to the floating milk bottle in 18 feet of water that marks the spot. When I dove this wreck about 6 months ago, the only structure was about a 15 foot section of the bow that Jets out of the sand. There are a few ropes attached that a large amount of Sea Horses have made what I've heard to be a permanent residence. Also seen were Conchs, Sand Dollars, Wrasses, Jellyfish and a large school of Spade Fish which was the highlight for me. Visibility on the first dive in the early AM was aprox 10 to 15feet. The second dive was only about 5 feet visibility in the late morning. This is the perfect beginner shore dive due to the shallow water and location of the Dive Shop. Directly across the street from the SeaTrek Dive Shop at Bradenton Beach and approximately 100 yards of shore sits the remains of the 247 foot tanker Regina.
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Blue Springs State Park

Florida, USA East

Not ranked yet
(9)
Spring, cavern and cave diving 35 miles North of Orlando
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Wreck of the Regina Aka Sugar Barge

Florida, USA East

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(5)
The wreck is very broken up and scattered with most of the large remains (stern section) about fifty feet north and about 100 feet out from the southwest buoy. The bow is towards the north. The water depth varies from 15 to 20 feet based. Different parts of the wreck are visible at different times due to storms and currents either depositing or removing sand from the area. Visibility is highly dependant on the prevailing wind direction and strength. The following website has some good photos of the wreck http://www.seatrekdivers.com/photogallery/photo_regina.htm This wreck accessible by shore is a part of the Florida State Underwater Archaeological Preserve. It is located off of Bradenton Beach just across from the street (Gulf Drive) from Seatrek Divers shop. The address is 105 7th St N. Bradenton Beach, FL 34217. To get to the site head towards the Bradenton Beach portion of Anna Maria Island via Gulf Drive. There is no local parking at the site devoted to the beach. One will have to drop off gear and find a parking spot close by. Depending on the day and time limited parking may be available around the building that the dive shop is in. Seatrek has successfully lobbied the local country government to place buoys off the wreck to aid in navigation. Unfortunately the county dropped the buoys in the wrong place so the diver will have to navigate in a direction off the buoys. (I am not an employee or being paid by Seatreck. They really are just across the street from the dive site)
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Santa Rosa Island

Florida, USA East

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(4)
Santa Rosa Island, jetties off Fort Pickens. This is a favorite shore dive for me...when the current is not too bad. Lots of shells about 30 feet outside the jetties.
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Deerfield Ledges

Florida, USA East

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(3)
I dove here in January 2002. I remember a large series of ledges inhabited by large numbers of fish. I really did not remember this as being as impressive as north Deerfield ledges were, but while I did not see any, I was told this is a good place to look for lobster. get off of the 95 at Hillsboro Blvd in Deerfield Beach. Go east to the A1A. Then go south on the A1A until you get to SE 5th Street. Once there go east for a short distance, then go S on S. Ocean way Follow this road, it will curve to the east. there will be parking at meters near the Cove Beach Club
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Shark Bay Exhibit At the Florida Aquarium

Florida, USA East

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(2)
The program is approximately 90-minutes and includes an educational presentation about sharks and a 30-minute dive in the Shark Bay exhibit. The divers will exit the shark cage with an Aquarium dive master and position themselves on the bottom of the exhibit in front of the exhibit window for optimal viewing of the sharks. Family and friends will be able to view the divers during all phases of the dive from the Sea Hunt gallery. The Shark Bay Exhibit at The Florida Aquarium, 701 Channelside Drive, Tampa, Florida. http://www.flaquarium.org/html/l2/l2_explore_dive.html From I-275 Southbound - Coming from North Tampa & Ocala Areas Take Exit 45A (OLD 26) Downtown East (Jefferson Street) Continue straight on Jefferson to Twiggs Left on Twiggs to Channelside Drive Right on Channelside Drive to Washington Street Left on Washington Street to Aquarium Parking
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Gulfstream Park

Florida, USA East

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This dive site has an amazing number of fish in it. Damsels, Parrotfish, doctor fish, barracuda, and a single nurse shark. I spent almost all my time on the ledge right on the shore, which made poor visibility, but it was still a good dive. Just follow one of the ledges for a while and you will see as many tropical fish as anywhere. If you start on I-95 get off on Woolbright Road and go east until you get to A1A turn right, and go about 0.5 miles until you see gulf stream park on the left. It will be about a quarter mile south of Nomad Surf Shop. From the lifeguard tower go south about a hundred feet, and enter there. There is a shallow ledge in about three feet of water, as well as an artificial reef about 150 feet out
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North Deerfield Ledges

Florida, USA East

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Of the five places I dived in Jan 2003 this was second only to breakers. It was easy to find the reef, clear, calm, and full of life. I saw angelfish, juvenile blue tangs, small grouper, doctor fish, triggerfish, schools of baitfish, a stingray, etc. I would not be surprised if lobster were in some of the ledges, but I did not see any, so maybe that is wishful thinking. from I 95 get off on Hillsboro Blvd in Deerfield beach. Go east until you get toA1A. Go north on A1A. The road might turn some, but continue on A1A until you get to the "Welcome to the city of Boca Raton" sign this is a good place to drop off your gear, there are parking meters about 400 yards south of here. Get into the beach using the access at the end of 7th street. Anywhere near this access is alright to get into the water. The reef starts between 150, and ends about 500feet off of the shore. It is hard to miss, and is pretty large.
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Worth avenue, Pier Debris

Florida, USA East

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I have been told there is pier debris straight out from worth avenue, I did not find this, not surprising since I went here on a stormy day. However I did find a series of ledges following the shore, about 200 yards out. These were inhabited by the usual cast of characters, damsels, doctor fish, triggerfish, etc. Closer to the shore There were huge schools Barracuda-like fish. When I swam past the ledges I found a reef containing mostly soft corals, with some large orange sponges as well. This is at the end of worth street in Lake Worth Florida. You can get here by exiting the 95 at Okeechobee Blvd then go east This road will dead-end into US1, take a left here, then an immediate right onto the bridge (lakeview avenue). Follow this road until the A1A then go south on A1A five blocks to worth avenue. There are meters along the ocean, a dollar an hour. To enter, go straight east from the dead-end of worth avenue. you can see the reef as a dark patch in the water.
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Spanish Rocks Reef

Florida, USA East

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Spanish Rocks Reef is unique in that it is one of the very rare saltwater shore dives on the west coast of Florida. This dive site consists of limestone ledges that vary in height off the bottom from about a foot to about five feet high in certain locations. Life on the ledges are sponges, tunicates, lots of sea weed, and some corals (hard coral, sea fans, gorgonians). Various tropical fish live on an around the ledges with turtles and nurse sharks spotted on occasion. Average depth is from 15 to 20 feet based on tides. Visibility is highly dependant upon prevailing wind direction and strength. This dive site located off of Bradenton Beach, FL on Anna Maria Island. To get to this location find the beach access point on Gulf Drive North and 33rd Street. 33rd Street is only 50 to 100 feet long and serves as the parking lot for the local beach access. A way to get there from the mainland is to take SR 64 (Manatee Ave.) to Gulf Drive North and then go south about a quarter mile. If you keep going south along gulf drive for about another 1.5 miles you will get to the other Brandenton Beach shore dive site the Wreck of the Regina (aka Sugar Barge). The 33rd St. Gulf Drive N. beach access is marked by a small blue green sign to the west. From the Beach access point find the reef by walking south along the beach six houses and then head out from there due west for a couple hundred yards. You have to go past the sandy bottom area. If the visibility is poor it can be easy to miss. The ledges then heads towards the west away from shore at an angle.
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Hollywood Beach

Florida, USA East

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Daytona Beach

Florida, USA East

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Poe Springs

Florida, USA East

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Mainly for snorkelers. Just up the road from Ginnie Springs.
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Mike's Wreck

Key Largo, FL

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If you plan to dive Key Largo, you'll find Mikes Wreck, or the now confirmed Hannah M. Bell, lying on Elbow Reef. Wreck. Once a mystery ship, this vessel rests near two other popular Florida Keys shipwrecks, the City of Washington and the Tonawanda The combination of Elbow Reef, along with three interesting wreck dives is why this is one of the best Florida Keys dive trips. With so many other wrecks nearby, crystal clear water, and an amazing coral reef to explore, this is scuba diving Florida Keys at it's best. When wreck diving the now confirmed Hannah M. Bell, you'll find her lying between buoy E2 and buoy E3. This position is only a few hundred feet from the Elbow Reef lighthouse which means night diving is possible. The Hannah M. Bell is also shallow at a maximum depth of 25 feet. This makes this Florida Keys wreck perfect for those interested in Florida Keys snorkeling or for those who want to learn to scuba dive.