Top Snorkeling and Scuba Diving in Ontario

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St. Lawrence River

Ontario, Canada

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(7)
We have some of the best fresh water wreck diving in the world and we want to share that with everyone! Michael and Debra of Diversparadise.net
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Fathom Five National Park of Canada

Ontario, Canada

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(3)
Fathom Five offers some of the best freshwater diving opportunities in the world. Clear, clean water, submerged geological formations (cliffs, caves, overhangs) and more than 20 historical shipwrecks offer a variety of underwater experiences. Everyone, from the novice snorkeler to the most advanced diving enthusiast, can find lots to explore and enjoy within the park.<br>From Tara Harpur at the park: We do have some excellent shore diving in the area of Fathom Five National Marine Park. The only sites that are shore accessible are sites 3, 4, 5 and 23 (The Lighthouse, The Anchor, The Tugs and the Little Cove). The other sites are not shore accessible due to various issues - private property, etc. If you have any questions please let us know! Fathom Five National Marine, Park P.O. Box 189 ,Tobermory, Ontario, Canada ,N0H 2R0, Administration: Phone: (519) 596-2233 Fax: (519) 596-2298, Diver Registration: Phone: (519) 596-2503 Fax: (519) 596-2552
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The Lighthouse

Ontario, Canada

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(3)
This is an excellent shore dive located in the Scuba Diving capital of Canada. Access is relatively easy for both entry and exit. This site boasts unique large rock formations and depths ranging from 30 feet to 90+ for the experienced diver. Visibility can be pretty good at 30 to 50 feet but can vary due to this location being very exposed to ferry currents and weather. Temperatures can range from 40+ in May/June to 60-70 in August. All in all, an A+ dive spot. Very close to all amenities with 2 reputable dive shops located in Tobermory. Tobermory, Ontario, Canada
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Innerkip Quarry

Ontario, Canada

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(8)
Cessna, bus! -- from B.E. Off H'401 exit 250, about 10k west from there. Put-in at the shore.
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Ceder Hill

Ontario, Canada

Not ranked yet
(1)
This is an excellent dive spot for a shore dive. It is located on Georgian Bay approximately 10 minutes east of Wiarton along Colpoys Bay (approximately 50 minutes south of Tobermory). Gearing up is made easy with a covered area and picnic tables located about 30 feet from the water. Access to the water is a rocky beach but easy none the less. Visibility varies to water conditions but usually varies from 20 feet to 55 feet. Water temperatures can range from 40+ degrees in early May to 70+ degrees in August. This location boasts many little "n-sunken"reasures to view at depths ranging from 20 feet to 80+ feet. The deepest I have traveled here is 103 feet but it kept going gradually. Occasionally you do have a moderate current to deal with, so if your dive is planned right, you can enjoy a nice drift dive back to your entry/exit point. Speaking from experience, WATCH OUT FOR BOATS!!! They seem to forget how close you can come to a dive flag (a MUST) in this area for some reason. All in all, this site is an excellent spot for the novice or advanced diver. Wiarton, Ontario, Canada
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Conestoga

Ontario, Canada

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(2)
On the St Laurence River From the 401 exit at Cardinal and head South to the River. At the river turn right. Find the dirt road behind the building. You will be able to see the parts of the wreck out of the water.
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Monarch

Ontario, Canada

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(2)
The Monarch (St. Clair River) is a 60 foot, wooden hulled, steam powered tug that sank in 1939. The Monarch is on her starboard side facing up river. Access into the main cabin allows you to get out of the current. The boilers and winches can be seen on the aft deck. Visibility can be up to 70 feet, if the wind has been from the south for a week or more. If there is a stiff north wind blowing, go somewhere else. This is an advanced dive due to the strong currents in the river and the freighter traffic overhead. Don't even think about trying to bring a float & flag with you. Head back when you are down to half of your air. Located just south of the Blue Water Bridge in Sarnia, Ontario. Entry point is by the large stanchion post about 300 yards south of the bridge. The local dive club maintains a cable that leads out to the wreck. The site can also be reached by diving on The Barge and drifting down river (see The Barge site).
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The Rothesay

Ontario, Canada

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(3)
The Rothesay is a 19th Century wooden side wheeler (193' x 28.8' x 7.9') and was launched in St. John, N.B. on Feb. 2, 1868. Initially she sailed between Fredricton and St. John but was later relocated to serve on the St. Lawrence River. She was carrying passengers between Brockville and Montreal when, on Sept. 12, 1889, she collided with the tug Myra and sank at her present location. Although no-one was lost from the Rothesay two crewmen on the tug were killed. In 1901 members of the Royal Military College in Kingston blew up the wreck amidships in a munitions exercise. The Rothesay was rediscovered on Sept. 25, 1964 by the Underwater Society of Ottawa and remains a very popular dive site. Bring a light to see into the chain locker and hold. Prepare for a 1 to 2 knot current along the surface. there is hardly any current at depth. Shore buoy marks the start of a 300 ft. line out to the wreck along the bottom. Follow the line, you arrive at the smoke stack. Upperwork lies at about 20 feet, maximum depth is 30 feet. Best visibility is early and late in the dive season, and varies from 5 to 10 feet. As with all Marine Historical Sites in Ontario, the Rothesay is property of The Province of Ontario and removal of any material is illegal. The Rothesay, is located in the St. Lawrence River, west of Prescott. It is accessible both by land and by boat. Follow Highway 401 and take the Highway 18 Exit (#716) to Prescott. Turn west on King St. W (Highway 2) and follow for 1.75 Km until you reach Riverview Heights. There you will see a Historic Marker along the south side of the road commemorating Justus Sherwood. The adjoining grass strip can accommodate about a dozen cars. From the embankment you will see a buoy approximately 300 ft out, marking the actual wreck and a jug closer in that is the beginning of the line.
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Gulliver's Lake

Ontario, Canada

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(6)
-- from B.E. West of H'6 at Harper's corner on Safari rd. Put-in at the shore.
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Chippawa Creek

Ontario, Canada

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(3)
Lovely drift dive! -- from Bozkurt Eralp<br><br> ****** WARNING *****<br><br> There have recently been two deaths from diving in this area. You may view the 2007 incident report published by the Ontario Underwater Council in our Links section below. We strongly recommend not diving this site until more is known about the causes of the accident.
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Fort Erie

Ontario, Canada

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(3)
There's some fun drift diving on the Canadian side of the Niagara River, going from Fort Erie downstream towards Niagara Falls. The Niagara Parkway (a nice two lane road that goes along the river) has lots of places to park and access the water. You'll need a diver down flag, because there's boat traffic. Stay in about 20-25 feet of water to avoid the current that can sweep you around to the New York side (passport needed and the Coast Guard will be really irritated). Viz is about 10 feet, current is relentless...If you get really lucky, you may find old bottles, golf balls, or perhaps relics from the War of 1812 to snatch up before you're dragged downstream...You'll need a tracker car as the current will take you a few miles (oh, yeah, stop before you get to the Falls! If you put in at Fort Erie, you'll run out of air before you get that far). A fun, local dive. Thanks for the great web site!
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Lake Simcoe

Ontario, Canada

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(2)
-- from Bozkurt Eralp
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Lake Street Wreck

Ontario, Canada

Not ranked yet
(1)
-- from Bozkurt Eralp Port Dalhousie, bit of a swim out. Put-in at the shore.
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The Conestoga

Ontario, Canada

Not ranked yet
(1)
The steamer Conestoga was built by Quale & Son of Cleveland for Anchor Line and launched July 6, 1878. A considerable amount of money, technical design and skill went into construction,, as evidenced by the description in the Cleveland Daily Plain Dealer on July 8, 1878: "Fitted out in all proportions with a care to strength, durability and beauty ... it is estimated that her cost will be near $90,000.00. Two hundred fifty-two feet long, sixteen feet deep with a gross tonnage of 1,226, Consetoga was powered by a steeple compound engine capable of a speed of 8 knots. The upper portion of the steeple engine protrudes above the river, marking the site. She sank on May 22, 1922 outside Lock 28 of the Old Gallop Canal, one mile east of Cardinal, Ontario. A fire broke out in the engine room while awaiting passage at the lock. The ship was flushed from the Lock and allowed to ground and sink in her present position. Loss was estimated at $200,000.00. She was carrying 30,000 bushels of wheat, much of which was salvaged. From Ottawa, take River Road South to the intersection of Regional Road No. 22 (Shanley Road). Follow Road No. 22 south to Cardinal. Continue straight toward the river, follow the road past the Legion out onto the dirt road on the causeway approximately 1 km. You will see the engine protruding from the water. There is a parking area. Food and lodging can be found in Cardinal. Although the wooden portions of the Conestoga are still in good condition, the upper areas are badly ice damaged and all metal is rusted and deteriorating. Conestoga has suffered greatly from looting and wreck-stripping by sport divers. One blade of the 14-foot propeller was broken off by an exploding dynamite charge during an unsuccessful salvage attempt.
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Navy Hall

Ontario, Canada

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(2)
Great 2-way (almost!) drift; easy return to starting point. -- from Bozkurt Eralp Ricardo st. South of Collingwood St. Put-in at the dock.
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Ryserson Park

Ontario, Canada

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(0)
In "Old Town" Niagara-On-The-Lake, there is a park called "Ryserson Park" it is on the south shore of Lake Ontario. Entry to the park is easy and there is a little bit of parking available. The park is by an old WWII era rifle range.
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The Bruce

Ontario, Canada

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(0)
This is a fun dive for intermediate and advanced divers. It is not recommended for beginners due to the low visibility. The Ottawa River water is very dark. An old station wagon is also located at the dive site. The site is located at the Ottawa rowing club. From Highway 417 (Queensway), take the Nicholas exit, and follow the signs towards Hull/Gatineau and Auto route 5. Just past the first set of lights at Laurier Avenue, (Nicholas becomes Waller St.) go straight through the intersections to Rideau St. ("T" Intersection). Turn right onto Rideau St. At the second lights, turn left onto King Edward Ave. Once on King Edward, stay in the right-hand lane and follow the road past the ramp to Hull/Gatineau and Auto route 5. At the end of King Edward ("T" Intersection), turn left onto Sussex Drive. Keep to the right. After the overpass for the bridge to Gatineau, turn right onto Lady Grey Drive. Follow the road down the hill - take the first right (way down). The ORC is at the bottom of the hill on the water's edge (obviously).