Top Snorkeling and Scuba Diving in Maui

The second largest island, known as the ‘Magic Island’ because of its inspiring beauty, Maui is also host to vast beaches and seemingly endless underwater reefs and exotic sea-life. A diver’s paradise!

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Lanai Cathedrals

Lanai, Hawaii

beginner
(3)
Off the island of Lanai is a remarkable dive spot known as Lanai Cathedrals. Inside pockmarked lava tubes, beams of light stream in with an ethereal glow creating an underwater cathedral. This beautiful dive is one you won't soon forget. After you take in the gorgeous views, exiting the cathedral can be quite a rush. There is a fun spot where there is a lava shoot where the surge can shoot you out as you exit the cathedral called 'shot gun'. Reef sharks, turtles, and many species found only in Hawai'i live around Cathedrals I and II (First Cathedral and Second Cathedral). With a max depth of 19 metres/65 feet and reliable visibility, Lanai's Cathedrals are accessible for divers of all experience levels. The most common way to dive Lanai Cathedrals is by booking a boat trip from Maui.
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Ahihi Cove

Maui, Hawaiian Islands

beginner
(15)
This is a must-do site! This picturesque area is perfect for beginners and advanced divers alike. The entry is easy, and the fish are friendly (they know they're protected here)! There are no facilities here, and the parking is limited-- but don't let that deter you! At the South End of Highway 31, bear right onto Wailea Iki. Continue to the T, turn left on Wailea Alanui, which becomes Makena Alanui. After 5.0 miles, you'll see the cove.
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Five Caves

Maui, Hawaiian Islands

intermediate
(22)
Five Caves is know by several names including Five Graves and Nahuna Point. This is a must-do dive for Maui, as the entry is easy and formations and sea creatures are impressive. If it is your first time to the area, a guide is recommended to ensure you find the caves on your first dive. The nearest facilities are at Makena Landing, just a short drive up the road. At the South End of Highway 31, bear right onto Wailea Iki. Continue to the T, turn left on Wailea Alanui. After 2.2 miles, turn right onto Makena Road. In a couple of hundred yards, you'll see the parking area.
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Wailea Beach

Maui, Hawaiian Islands

beginner
(8)
Wailea Beach is a great site for scuba. Full facilities, and a great beach for all ages. At the South End of Highway 31, bear right onto Wailea Iki. Continue to the T, turn left on Wailea Alanui. In .5 miles, turn right into the public access.
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Napili Bay

Lahaina, Maui, Hawaii

beginner
(5)
Entry is sandy, and the bottom is sandy with moderately steep entry and then reef further out. Sea turtles frequent the bay, and snorkeling can be fair when the surf is mellow. When the surf is up visibility, and thus snorkeling, is poor. The water is frequently glassy, but when big swells come in waves can become quite large, and the rip currents which form here pull directly out to sea. Less experienced swimmers should avoid the water here during such conditions. There are restaurants, bathrooms and a general store in the resort. There is a shopping center with supermarket between the main highway and the resort.
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McGregor Point Site 2

Maui, Hawaiian Islands

Not ranked yet
(2)
This is the North side site of McGregor point found at the mile 7.7 mark. Entry should only be attempted in calm seas. There are no facilities here, so bring water. Look for the light house at about the 7.7 mile mark of Highway 30. Turn onto the dirt road.
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Molokini Backwall

Molokini, Maui, Hawaii

advanced
(2)
An advanced dive, the Molokini Backwall is a world class wall and drift dive for certified divers only. The Wall is approximately 300ft in depth, however, divers will level off at 80 ft or less. You may see white tip, black tip, and gray reef sharks, manta rays, dolphins and schooling fish.
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Mokule'ia Beach (Slaughterhouse)

Kaanapali, Maui, HI

beginner
(7)
Mokule'ia is another great dive and snorkel site, but it's a good hike down to the beach. A great place to spend the day with the kids, so bring a cooler with food and water. The name “Slaughterhouse Beach” comes from the Honolua Ranch slaughterhouse and tanning/storage shed that were (oh, so conveniently) located on the cliff’s edge above the ocean. The buildings were torn down in the 60’s, but the lovely name stuck. In contrast, the Hawaiian name Mokule’ia means “district of abundance”, and like most Hawaiian names, is a very accurate description. Mokule’ia Bay is part of the same preserve as its neighbor Honolua Bay: the Honolua-Mokule’ia Bay Marine Life Conservation District. But unlike its rocky neighbor to the north, much of the year this bay has a nice sandy beach to relax on. During the winter months there are often large well-formed waves that are perfect for the more experienced boogie boarders and surfers. But the large surf can often become dangerous, and even the most experienced need to keep a healthy respect for the ocean in mind. In summer months the waves are much more mellow and are often suitable for beginners. When the ocean is tame there is also very good snorkeling around the the north point and into Honolua Bay. Travel North on Highway 31 until about mile mark 32.6. You can't miss the bay off to your left.
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Mala Wharf

Lahaina, Maui, Hawaii

intermediate
(27)
Mala Wharf (sometimes called Mala Pier) was once a fully-functioning pier which served as a shipping facility for the island’s pineapple and agriculture. In 1992, however, 30 ft. surf came marching into Lahaina as a result of Hurricane Iniki, and the end of the dock was completely destroyed. Today, the pilings from the old dock lie scattered along the ocean floor, and what was once a shipping facility above water is now a healthy artificial reef which is home to a vast array of marine life.
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Kapalua Bay

Kapalua, Maui, Hawaii

beginner
(24)
Kapalua Bay is a sheltered white sand beach on the north west side of Maui. The bay is protected by two reefs that extend out on both ends forming a C-shaped cove making it ideal for snorkeling. The bay’s calm water makes it one of those perfect places for beginner snorkeling and is an ideal spot to take the kids. Getting into the water couldn’t be easier. The ocean will literally be a few feet from your beach towel. The Kapalua Bay Hotel overlooks the beach’s soft sand and tranquil blue water.
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Haloa Point

Maui, Hawaiian Islands

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(6)
Haloa Point is an excellent dive site for all levels. There are no facilities here, so bring water. At the South End of Highway 31, bear right onto Wailea Iki. Continue to the T, turn left on Wailea Alanui. After 1 mile, turn right onto Kuakahi. Drive down to the T and turn left. Continue for about .4 mile. Park on either side of the road. You've gone too far if you've come back to Wailea Alanui.
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Makena Landing

Wailea, Maui, Hawaii

intermediate
(35)
Located in a stone’s throw from the Grand Wailea in south Maui, Makena Landing is a favorite retreat for both Maui locals and visitors. Despite its relatively small, sandy beach, Makena Landing boasts one of the most accessible coral reefs on the island. While not ideal for sunbathing, it is a perfect spot for those looking to enjoy Maui’s underwater world. From snorkeling and SCUBA diving to kayaking and stand up paddle boarding, Makena Landing offers a wide range of ocean activities. The area is an active launching area with numerous tour operators offering local kayak and stand up paddle boarding (SUP) trips.
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Ahihi Bay

Maui, Hawaiian Islands

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(1)
For a more rugged adventure, try Ahihi Bay. You'll find no facilites here, but you will find a private beach some excellent snorkelling and diving. At the South End of Highway 31, bear right onto Wailea Iki. Continue to the T, turn left on Wailea Alanui, which becomes Makena Alanui. After 5.5 miles, you'll see the parking to the right.
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Mana Kai Hotel

Maui, Hawaiian Islands

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(4)
Mana Kai Hotel has a public access to some very fine diving. The snorkeling is good here, and diving is good in calmer seas. In Kihei, driving South on Highway 31, turn right at mile marker 9 onto Keonekai Road. At the T, turn left onto South Kihei Road. After .6 miles, turn right into the Mana Kai Hotel.
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Polo Beach

Maui, Hawaiian Islands

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(5)
Polo Beach is a good site for beginner diving. Easy access and all facilities. At the South End of Highway 31, bear right onto Wailea Iki. Continue to the T, turn left on Wailea Alanui. In 1 mile, turn right onto Kuakahi. Drive down to the T and turn right into the public access.
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Black Sand Beach

Maui, Hawaiian Islands

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(7)
During good conditions, Black Sand Beach can provide excellent snorkelling and diving opportunities. Expect no facilities, so bring along your comforts of home! At the South End of Highway 31, bear right onto Wailea Iki. Continue to the T, turn left on Wailea Alanui. After 2.2 miles, turn right onto Makena Road. In 1.6 miles, you'll see the turn-off.
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Olowalu Mile Marker 14

Olowalu, Maui, Hawaii

beginner
(21)
Mile Marker 14 is the common nickname for a beach in Olowalu, on the west side of Maui. You can find it by looking for the “14” mile marker sign between Lahaina and the cliffs that separate west Maui from central Maui. It’s seven miles south of Lahaina on the Honoapiilani Highway (Route 30). This area is said to be the best snorkel spot for beginners. The water is shallow close to shore and is calm on most days (usually most calm in the mornings). Be careful not to step on or touch the coral reef. No facilities. No turn lanes or paved parking, so watch for traffic when turning back onto the highway. The beach is not as wide or beautiful as some other Maui beaches, so this spot is best for snorkeling but not best for lying on the beach.
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Airport Beach (Kahekili Beach Park)

Kaanapali, Maui, Hawaii

beginner
(23)
Kahekili Beach Park is the park that includes Airport Beach Maui. It’s sometimes called North Beach because it is the north half of Kaanapali Beach. Airport Beach Maui in Kahekili Beach Park is one of Maui’s best beaches for several reasons. It is adjacent to Kaanapali Beach, the most famous beach in Maui, but it is not nearly as crowded as the main section of Kaanapali Beach, because it does not have any of the major resort hotels found in that nearby area (the Hyatt, Marriott, Westin, and Sheraton). It has a long wide stretch of smooth light sand. The ocean near shore is shallow. The waves are usually not too big for swimming. It’s a great snorkeling spot with plenty of fish to see, including the Hawaii state fish, the humuhumunukunukuapuaa. Kahekili Beach Park has a large free parking lot. There is a pavilion with benches and picnic tables. Additional picnic tables are on the grassy areas. There are real bathrooms. The boardwalk through the park provides a paved path for walking several miles along the beach. Airport Beach Maui is within a ten minute walk of several large condos, including Maui Kaanapali Villas, Westin Kaanapali Ocean Resort Villas, Nanea Ocean Villas, Honua Kai, and Mahana. Why is this called Airport Beach? From 1961 to 1986 there was a small airport here called Kaanapali Airport (HKP). Royal Hawaiian Air Service was the airline that flew small twin-engine Cessna propeller planes here from Oahu. The 2615-foot runway was surrounded by sugar cane. The small A-frame terminal had an upstairs bar called the Windsock Lounge. Who was Kahekili that this park is named after? He lived from 1737 to 1794 and was the last king of Maui from 1766 to 1793, before King Kamehameha came from the Big Island of Hawaii to conquer Maui and unite the Hawaiian islands into the Kingdom of Hawaii.
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Pu'u Olai Beach

Maui, Hawaiian Islands

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(10)
Pu'u Olai Beach has an incredible rocky point to explore! With two beaches to choose from, you may begin diving from either. The hike to remote beach is a bit tiring but may be worth it for you naturists! Due to the open-water nature of this area, do not dive unless you are capable of high surf entry and exit. At the South End of Highway 31, bear right onto Wailea Iki. Continue to the T, turn left on Wailea Alanui. After 2.2 miles, turn right onto Makena Road. In 1.7 miles, you'll see the turn-off.
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Honolua Bay

Kaanapali, Maui, Hawaii

beginner
(37)
Honolua Bay is a Marine Life Conservation District located on the north western end of Maui. No fishing of any kind is allowed here making for a sealife density and diversity that is second to none on the Valley Isle. Honolua Bay is surrounded by high rocky cliffs on both sides that shelter it from the wind and keep the water calm. An old cement boat ramp in the center of the beach divides the shoreline in two. As you sit on the beach you will be looking out across the Pailolo Channel at the eastern shores of the Island of Molokai.
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McGregor Point Site 1

Maui, Hawaiian Islands

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(2)
McGregor Point Site 1 is the Southern side of the point at the mile 7.7 mark. Entry is considerably easier than Site 2. There are no facilities. Look for the light house at about the 7.7 mile mark of Highway 30. Turn onto the dirt road.
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Hoala Point

Maui, Hawaiian Islands

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(2)
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Honokohau Bay

Maui, Hawaiian Islands

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(2)
Under Construction! Under Construction!
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Molokai Hammerhead Dive (Mokuhoʻoniki)

Molokai, Maui, Hawaii

advanced
(2)
An advanced dive that leaves from Maui over to the coast of the neighboring island of Molokai. In the summer, there is a pod of hammerhead sharks that swims in the area. The best time for this dive is in the summer months, around May to September. The crossing is notoriously rough, so be prepared with some anti-nausea pills.
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Nakalele Point

Maui, Hawaiian Islands

advanced
(2)
Level Of Skill: Advanced Divers, No Exceptions Depth Of Location: 150 feet max, but you only need to dive to 80 to conserve air Transportation Needed: A car How To Get There: Drive North on Honoapiilani Hwy. 30. past Lahaina and Kapalua. It is at the 38 mile marker. Turn left at the Nakalele Point Light Station sign. Park as close to the lighthouse as your car will allow you. Walk your way in. When To Snorkel Or Dive: Summer and Autumn. To rough in winter. Also, all site are better in the morning before the wind kicks up. Where To Snorkel Or Dive: Check the map. Go along the wall till your halfway out of air and start back at a different depth for another view. What You May Find: A extremely large amount of reef fish and a beautiful, colorful reef. One of the best dives on the island. Best wall dive outside Molokini. Site Hazards: High surf in the winter, tricky entry/exit, tough walk down Site Facilities: None Notes Of Interest: Wear a wetsuit for protection from rocks. Only advanced divers.
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Pauwela Point

Maui, Hawaiian Islands

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(2)
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Palauea Beach (White Rock)

Maui, Hawaiian Islands

beginner
(3)
Lesser known Palauea Beach, or White Rock in the Scuba community, is an excellent dive site. Perfect for beginners and intermediates. Closest facilities are a short drive North to Polo Beach. At the South End of Highway 31, bear right onto Wailea Iki. Continue to the T, turn left on Wailea Alanui. After 1 mile, turn right onto Kuakahi. Drive down to the T and turn left onto Makena Road. Continue for a little less than half a mile. Park on shore side of the road onto an unpaved small parking area. Basically, this is the South side of Haloa Point.
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Turtle Town

Maui, Hawaiian Islands

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(4)
Across the road from the parking area is a trail leading into the dive site. About mid-way the trail branches; to the left lies 5 caves, to the right lies turtle town. Follow the right trail into the narrow bay, and crawl down the rocks on the north (right) side of the bay into the water. This is actually easier at low tide as a series of stone "steps" becomes exposed, thus easing entry. From the bay you want to swim straight out to sea, following the rock point to your left. The dive itself consists of a series of interlinking reefs. The life among these reefs is the same as you would see at 5 caves, although not as densely packed. The dive site is well named, as you are bound to see several turtles every dive (we saw a dozen in a 40 minute dive). This is also a popular site for dive boats to drop off snorkelers, so there can be a lot of traffic on the surface. The dive itself is 20' to 35' deep. Visibility is good once you clear the entry point - the water upon entry is very turbid due to a fresh-water stream which flows into the bay. For an easier exit you can swim around the rock point to the 5-caves entry, although if there are waves the turtle point entry is safer and more protected. This site is located immediately next to 5 caves, and shares the same parking area/access trails. At the South End of Highway 31 bear right onto Wailea Iki. Continue to the T, turn left on Wailea Alanui. After 2.2 miles, turn right onto Makena Road. (There are two Makena Roads, its the second one ie NOT the one right before Po'olenalean Beach). In a couple of hundred yards, you'll see the parking area.
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Papawai Point

Maui, Hawaii

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(8)
Papawai Point is a great vantage point for viewing the Maui coast line. The diving here can be spectacular, although the entry is for advanced shore divers only. Check it out to see if you are comfortable. Also, be sure to look for the local artists, working on their baskets and drawings. Talk to them and patronize their work!
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Maliko Bay

Haiku-Pauwela, Maui, HI

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(5)
Maliko Gulch is located on Maui's north shore. Just passed Hookipa beach park on the road to Hana you'll head down hill to the bridge that crosses Maliko stream. Immediately on the other side of the bridge turn right and follow the road beside the stream and under the bridge. You can dive either side of Maliko but the steam ship anchors and most interesting swim throughs are on the right (East) side of the bay. There is a small wall at the end end of the east finger. At its base and 10 meters north are the 2 steam ship anchors. The hard corals at Maliko bay are healthy and the topography is interesting. If you continue around and to the east you'll find 3 deep ravines in the cliff side and any of them lead south west back into the bay. Going this far requires good air consumption a hot fill and a long surface swim. Turtles are common here but shy. They see few divers here on the wilder side of Maui. This is a good place to spot Devil Scorpion Fish, Spiny Lobsters, Ridge Back Slipper Lobsters. Lots of little caves hide surprises such as large Conger eels and Spanish dancers. Some of the caves are large enough to enter but use caution. They are sometimes less easy to get out of.
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Ulua Beach

Wailea, Maui, Hawaii

beginner
(37)
Ulua Beach is one of the beaches in the Wailea resort complex development on Maui's south shore. The sandy beach is located between two rocky points. Ulua Beach is a bit more popular than neighboring Mokapu Beach, with which it shares a parking lot. When the surf is up, it is usually a little higher here than at other beaches in this area, attracting many bodyboarders who enjoy the waves. During calm days, the snorkeling and diving here is excellent. There are many colorful corals and fish. Ulua means `adult crevalle fish in the Hawaiian language.
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Ahihi-Kinau Natural Area Reserve

Wailea, Maui, Hawaii

beginner
(14)
The ‘Ahihi-Kina‘u reserve is located on the southwest corner of the island of Maui and was the first designated Natural Area Reserve in 1973. The 1,238 acres contain marine ecosystems (807 submereged acres), rare and fragile anchialine ponds, and lava fields from the last eruption of Haleakala 200-500 years ago. Native plant communities that include naio, wiliwili and native cotton exist in kipuka, or pockets, but are severly imperiled by the encroachment of weeds and feral ungulates such as goats. A coral reef survey done by the Division of Aquatic Resources in 2007 indicated that the reef community within the NAR boundary waters was the only reef from their test sites that was not declining overall. Preserving the integrity of the anchialine pools is a major management focus. All access to them is closed. Main threats to these wetlands include non-native invasives such as fish or prawns, algal mat formations, and human disturbance.
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Black Rock

Kaanapali, Maui, Hawaii

beginner
(59)
Black Rock was formed from one of the last-gasp lava flows on this side of the island. It is a rocky outcrop at the far North end of Ka’anapali Beach and blocks off access (from the beach) to the lesser-known Ka’anapali Resort beach called Kahekili Beach Park. The Hawai’ian name for Black Rock is Pu’u Keka’a, and ancient Hawaiians believed that this was the place where their spirits went to jump off to join ancestors forever. Unlucky souls who could not be shown the way by their family ‘aumakua (guardian animal spirit), would wander and attach themselves to rocks in the area. This is likely where the “it is bad luck to take a Hawai’ian lava rock” superstition comes from. This is also a popular spot for cliff jumping. If you are cliff jumping, swim to the far side of the rock and climb up from there. It's much more challenging and dangerous to reach the rock by click up it from shore.
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Molokini

Molokini, Maui, Hawaii

beginner
(3)
Molokini Crater in Maui boasts some of the most unique geological features in the world. Not only is it a marine preserve, it is also a federally owned and protected Seabird sanctuary. The two nesting birds that most frequent the area are the Wedge-Tailed Shearwater and the Bulwer’s Petrel. The visibility in this beautiful crater is often 150 feet deep and there are an estimated 250 species of fish and 38 hard coral species. The humuhumunukunukuapua’a, which is Hawai’is state fish, can often be spotted at the crater. You may even see moray eels, octopus and reef sharks. From the months of December-April our guests also frequently see majestic humpback whales on their boat ride to and from the crater. The waters surrounding the area are part of the Hawaiian Islands Humback Whale Marine Sanctuary. Considered to be an underwater paradise by many, it is no wonder that Molokini is one of the most popular dive and snorkel sites in Hawaii.
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Kamaole 2

Kihei, Maui, Hawaii

beginner
(9)
Another fairly wide sandy beach, the Maui Banyan sits on the end of this beach. While they like to tout it as “one of the finest beaches on Maui”, that claim is a bit exaggerated. What they don’t share in the glossy literature is that after large Kona storms, the sand can temporarily be removed by the ocean leaving rounded lava rock (resembling river rocks, except black.) In fact, the old-time Hawai’ian name for this beach (you know, from the folks that weren’t trying to sell you a condo) is “Ili’iliholo”, which literally means “running pebbles.” (Salesman bashing aside, most days of the year this is still a pretty nice beach!)
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La Perouse

Maui, Hawaiian Islands

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(11)
This is a site for every skill level. The entry is easy and protected, with lots to see close to shore and further out into the bay. Beware of the surf conditions-- talk to your local dive shop to be sure. This is a bare-bones park-- bring everything with you! At the South End of Highway 31, bear right onto Wailea Iki. Continue to the T, turn left on Wailea Alanui, which becomes Makena Alanui. After 6.7 miles, you'll see the intersection below.
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Kamaole 3

Kihei, Maui, Hawaii

beginner
(7)
Kam III is the most popular of the three beaches. It is also the best for boogie-boarding, with a regular break here that can get fairly large during south swells. It is shortest and least wide of the Kama’oles, but it does have the most facilities and a gigantic grassy park area. It also has a new playground and bathroom, and plenty of parking (But weekends & holidays are very popular here – so you will probably need to park in the overflow parking lot.) Be aware that some Large rocks are found protruding from the ocean (and less so, the sand) along some pockets of Kam III. There is also a second rock-bracketed area that forms a more protected cove at the south end Kam III, the cove is called Ana’iao by old-timers. (You’ll likely be the only person there that knows that name!)
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Kamaole 1

Kihei, Maui, Hawaii

beginner
(3)
A wide, sandy beach, with good swimming. The north end of this stretch of beach is called “Charley Young Beach.” Charley Young was a military reporter who came at the wrong time to build his house here – during WWII all these beaches were taken over and made to simulate enemy beach landings. Anyway, Charley got his land back after the war, and built his house. The Charley Young end of Kam I is more popular with locals, and since the lifeguard and more visible parking and beach access for Kam I is at the other end of the beach, Charley Young is not usually as crowded with visitors. The Charley Young parking lot is on Kaiau St., as is a public access path and stairs to that end of the beach. Parking for the rest of Kam I is at the main parking area right in front of the beach, on street, and at an overflow lot across the road. (see Google map below for all Kam parking lots.)
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Manohole

Maui, Hawaiian Islands

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(3)
Manohole is another great dive. Entry should be attempted only during calm seas. There are no facilities here. Manohole is located at the mile 8.2 mark on Highway 30. Look for the washed out entrance road.
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Marriott Beach

Maui, Hawaiian Islands

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(1)
Marriott's parking is just before the hotel. Walk to the beach and enter in front of the activity booth. The reef is to the left, very large turtles here. This is a intermediate/advanced site because of currents and surf.
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St. Anthony Shipwreck

Kihei, Maui, HI

intermediate
(1)
Location to tire reef and boat is approximately a 240 degree heading from bottom of stairs, about a .4 mile swim, 70 feet depth. Dive site is do-able from shore, with scooters or fairly long surface swim, many use kayaks to get there. Keep going South on S Kihei Road, do not veer left to go to Wailea, road dead ends, turn right at end, Park at Keawakapu Beach Parking. There is a beach shower near stairs, no fixed restroom facilities, porta-pottys only. Reef dive is very good here. St. Anthony is a 65-foot shrimp boat was intentionally sunk in October 1997, creating Maui’s most popular wreck dive and home to many Green Sea Turtles. The turtles can be seen on the decks, inside the V-berth and cabins. On occasion you even may encounter a turtle clinging on one of the horizontal or vertical bars while it rests. What a great dive! Along the sandy bottom next to the wreck, old tires and cement blocks are scattered, creating an artificial reef that is fun to explore. In addition to turtles, you may see Moray Eels, Trumpetfish, Batfish, reef sharks, and an abundant supply of curious Milletseed Butterflyfish.
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Maluaka Beach (aka Turtle Town)

Wailea, Maui, Hawaii

beginner
(2)
At the south end of the beach, there is excellent snorkeling, and good diving a bit further out. At the north end of the beach there is decent snorkeling, but it is a bit shallow for diving. As with most beach in the islands, if the surf is crashing, stay out of the water. Rip tides and strong currents pose a genuine threat. There is no full time lifeguard. Parking is just past the Maui Prince Hotel. Do not leave any valuables in your car or unattended on the beach. There is a second parking lot near the Keawala'i Church but it is kind of isolated. The showers and restrooms are at the parking lot across the street from the church.
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Kahakuloe Head

Maui, Hawaiian Islands

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(1)
Under Construction! Under Construction!
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Carthaginian

Lahaina, Maui, Hawaii

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(1)
Carthaginian II sits at a max depth of 97 feet on a sandy seabed. There is typically a slight current on the site, but the wreck is appropriate for scuba divers of beginner and intermediate skill levels. The masts have collapsed on deck, and divers can swim through the large, accessible hold. The engine room and forward compartment have been closed off, but scuba divers can still peer in through the bars. Frogfish can be found all over the wreck, so keep a sharp eye out. Trumpet fish, sergeant major, orange spine unicornfish, rainbow cleaner wrasse and other small fish can be seen swimming about the ship. It is also possible to see turtles, sharks and eagle rays on this site.
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Papalua Beach

Maui, Hawaiian Islands

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(1)
Beginner and Intermediate Diving. Average depth is 35 to 45 feet, maximum depth is about 125 feet. This area is located at the East end of Papalua beach (near the highway tunnel). Entrance is on the beach right where the shoreline changes to rocks. There is wonderful coral here, some of the best in the area. There are also lots of turtles. There isn't a big variety of reef fish, and the fish are timid and won't let you approach them. There are some restrooms (actually port-a-johns) and a phone. There are also a few picnic tables and some of the area is shaded by trees. The nearest food and drink is either Ma'alaea Harbor or Olowalu General Store. There are no life guards at this location. Snorkeling is great, scuba diving is excellent, and when the surf is up, this is a great place to surf .The calm water area on the east is called "Coral Gardens" and is great for snorkeling and diving. The area on the west is called "Thousand Peaks", a good place for surfing. Thousand Peaks has hundreds of large coral heads ranging from 5 feet to 30 feet from the surface. Whale watching at this beach during the humpback whale season, December thru April is great. Papalua beach is located between Olowalu and the tunnel on the main highway. Travel from Lahaina along the Honoapiilani past Olowalu, mile marker 14, and right before the tunnel pull off the highway and park anywhere you can along here.
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Landing Craft and Tank

Kihei, Maui, HI

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Remnants of World War II, the Tank and Landing Craft wrecks are in 60 feet of crystal clear water off the coast of the Makena Golf and Beach Resort. Still recognizable after 60+ years underwater, eels have taken up residency in the pipes and barrels. A strange mix of weaponry and old ammunition are interspersed with a plethora of sea life. Schools of Weke or goat fish swim around the wreck in synchronistic harmony. Octopus are regularly found here. The short swim from one wreck to the other over a sandy bottom, offers an opportunity to find shells. Fragile, but beautiful, Sea Biscuit’s litter the sandy bottom and challenge scuba divers to pick them up without breaking them.
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Wahikuli Park

Maui, Hawaiian Islands

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Kahana

Maui, Hawaiian Islands

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Hyatt Reef

Maui, Hawaiian Islands

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Mokolea Point

Maui, Hawaiian Islands

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Under Construction! Under Construction!